Resources RSS



Burned to a crisp

If you play golf, there's a good chance you'll get skin cancer You read that right. We'd love to be able to tell you that all the damage you've done to your skin while playing golf without wearing sunscreen can be reversed. Some of it can, but the jarring reality is that one out of every five Americans (one in three Caucasians) will develop some form of skin cancer in their lifetime. Every dermatologist we spoke with thinks the odds are even worse for golfers. Want to know why? Hint: It's not simply because we might be out in the sun more than most Americans. "I don't think it's ignorance, and I don't think it's inherent in being exposed to...

Continue reading



What Can I Do to Reduce My Risk of Skin Cancer?

Protection from ultraviolet (UV) radiation is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach. UV rays from the sun can reach you on cloudy and hazy days, as well as bright and sunny days. UV rays also reflect off of surfaces like water, cement, sand, and snow. Indoor tanning (using a tanning bed, booth, or sunlamp to get tan) exposes users to UV radiation. The hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Daylight Saving Time (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. standard time) are the most hazardous for UV exposure outdoors in the continental United States. UV rays from sunlight are the greatest during the late spring and early summer in North America. CDC recommends easy...

Continue reading



Don't forget sunscreen when gardening, men warned, as skin cancer rate rockets

Middle-aged men are increased risk at getting skin cancer because they do no use suncreen while playing golf, mowing the lawn or gardening, health experts have warned It is unlikely that most middle-aged men would consider slapping on the sunscreen while popping out for a spot of gardening, mowing the lawn or washing the car. But new figures suggest skin cancer rates are rising faster in over-60s in England than any other group. New Public Health England figures show that most common type of skin cancer - superficial spreading melanoma - has increased by 12 per cent since 1990 for middle-aged men, compared with just eight per cent in the under 60s. Health experts are concerned that sun protection campaigns...

Continue reading



What goes on first?

If you’re a regular sunscreen user who also uses cosmetics or topical medications, you’ve probably wondered what the proper order is for applying these products. Does sunscreen go on first? Last? In the middle? “You’ve probably wondered what the proper order is for applying these products. Does sunscreen go on first? Last? In the middle? First topical medications, then sunscreen,” says Bradford R. Katchen, MD, associate professor of dermatology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York City. “If sunscreen is applied first, it might interfere with the medication’s penetration and might inactivate the active ingredient. For that reason, medication should always be the first product applied to a clean, washed face.” If you’re also using a moisturizer, it should go on...

Continue reading