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Golf: You've Got Skin in the Game

The PGA TOUR shares The Skin Cancer Foundation’s commitment to reaching men at risk with skin cancer prevention information. They debuted the awareness video below while being honored at the 2012 Skin Cancer Foundation Gala. Skin Cancer and Golfers 65% of melanoma cases are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Men over age 40 have the highest annual exposure to UV radiation. The majority of people diagnosed with melanoma are white men over age 50. Melanoma is one of only three cancers with an increasing mortality rate for men. Prevention Guidelines for Golfers 1. Early / Late Tee Time Tee off at sunrise or in late afternoon — avoid the sun at its most intense (between...

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Skin cancer: The not-so-hidden danger on the course

It’s not the water hazard on the back side, or that bunker in front of No. 18 that’s the biggest opponent on the course. It’s the sun. Who cares if you get a little sunburn? How bad can it be? The reality of this seemingly little discomfort is far worse than the pain involved in healing from a sunburn. Skin cancer in all of its forms can be disfiguring and fatal if left untreated. The problem most golfers have in protecting themselves is with sunscreen and the slippery residue left on their hands after applying. If the residue gets on your grips, they can be harder to hold on to than an oil-soaked baby seal. With this in mind, there...

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Burned to a crisp

If you play golf, there's a good chance you'll get skin cancer You read that right. We'd love to be able to tell you that all the damage you've done to your skin while playing golf without wearing sunscreen can be reversed. Some of it can, but the jarring reality is that one out of every five Americans (one in three Caucasians) will develop some form of skin cancer in their lifetime. Every dermatologist we spoke with thinks the odds are even worse for golfers. Want to know why? Hint: It's not simply because we might be out in the sun more than most Americans. "I don't think it's ignorance, and I don't think it's inherent in being exposed to...

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What Can I Do to Reduce My Risk of Skin Cancer?

Protection from ultraviolet (UV) radiation is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach. UV rays from the sun can reach you on cloudy and hazy days, as well as bright and sunny days. UV rays also reflect off of surfaces like water, cement, sand, and snow. Indoor tanning (using a tanning bed, booth, or sunlamp to get tan) exposes users to UV radiation. The hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Daylight Saving Time (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. standard time) are the most hazardous for UV exposure outdoors in the continental United States. UV rays from sunlight are the greatest during the late spring and early summer in North America. CDC recommends easy...

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Don't forget sunscreen when gardening, men warned, as skin cancer rate rockets

Middle-aged men are increased risk at getting skin cancer because they do no use suncreen while playing golf, mowing the lawn or gardening, health experts have warned It is unlikely that most middle-aged men would consider slapping on the sunscreen while popping out for a spot of gardening, mowing the lawn or washing the car. But new figures suggest skin cancer rates are rising faster in over-60s in England than any other group. New Public Health England figures show that most common type of skin cancer - superficial spreading melanoma - has increased by 12 per cent since 1990 for middle-aged men, compared with just eight per cent in the under 60s. Health experts are concerned that sun protection campaigns...

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